Solar Eclipse – August 21, 2017

Posted by as Events, News

Victoria will experience a 90% solar eclipse on the morning of Monday, August 21, 2017 with the maximum at 10:20 a.m.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: Approved eclipse glasses or approved eclipse filters must be used at ALL times when looking at the sun. Serious and irreversible eye damage may result from looking at the sun without approved safety equipment.

Important eclipse planning information

Press Release


Here are the public viewing sites in the Capital Region that have been identified:

Mount Tolmie Park – RASC members will be at the summit with solar telescopes and eclipse viewers.

Royal BC Museum area – RASC members will be near the museum with solar telescopes and eclipse viewers.

University of Victoria Observatory – UVic is hosting a special public open house at the UVic Observatory (Bob Wright Building – 5th floor) on Monday, August 21, 2017 from 9 to 11:30 a.m. to view the solar eclipse. The eclipse will be visible at 90% coverage from Victoria. The eclipse begins at 9:08 a.m., reaches maximum coverage at 10:20 a.m., and will end at 11:38 a.m.We will have eclipse glasses for the public to use and share, as well as special solar telescopes which will project an image of the Sun on a small white screen (attached to the telescope) to clearly show the eclipse. Looking at the Sun directly, even during maximum coverage, is damaging to your eyes. We request the public to leave the eclipse glasses behind after use. The event is free and no preregistration is necessary. The observatory will be open for the duration, and you are welcome to come and go as you wish. Please contact the Physics & Astronomy main office (250-721-7700) if you need any further information. Please note, pay parking is in effect on the University campus. The Bob Wright Building is easily accessible by bus.

Continue to check this site for additional sites as they are added.

 


Useful links:

NASA eclipse site – includes important safety information and an interactive map so you can determine the eclipse times at your location

Mr Eclipse – a lot of good information from eclipse viewing experts

American Astronomical Society – list of reputable vendors of solar viewers and filters

Press Release: RASC Victoria – August 21 Eclipse Viewing

Posted by as News, Special Events

RASC VICTORIA CENTRE ANNOUNCES AUGUST 21 ECLIPSE VIEWING IN VICTORIA

Viewing planned for Royal BC Museum, Mount Tolmie & Metchosin Cricket Pitch

Members of the Victoria Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will be setting up their solar telescopes in three locations around Greater Victoria for public viewing of the solar eclipse on the morning of Monday August 21.

Because looking directly at the Sun at any time is dangerous without proper protection, the telescopes at these events will be equipped with shielding to allow members of the public to safely see the eclipse. While the eclipse will be total in some parts of the United States, the eclipse in Victoria will be only a partial eclipse, where parts of the Sun will always be visible. The August 21 eclipse in Victoria will begin at 9:08 a.m. and end at 11:38 a.m. At 10:20 a.m., the Moon will block around 90 percent of the Sun as seen from Victoria.

RASC members will be setting up their telescopes during the eclipse on the morning of August 21 in front of the Bell Tower at the Royal B.C. Museum at 675 Belleville Street in Victoria, at the Cricket Pitch in Metchosin behind the Fire Hall at 4400 Happy Valley Road, and at Mount Tolmie Park off Cedar Hill X Road in Saanich, which can be reached by going up Mayfair Drive to the top of the Mountain, where telescopes will be located on the water reservoir facing south.

The University of Victoria will hold an open house for eclipse viewing that morning open to the public at the UVic Observatory on the fifth floor of the Bob Wright Building.

There will be no public eclipse viewing at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.

For more information on the Victoria Centre of the RASC, please go to our website at https://www.victoria.rasc.ca
For UVic eclipse information, see http://www.uvic.ca/science/physics/about/home/news/current/solar-eclipse.php

-30-

Contact person: Ken Mallory outreach@victoria.rasc.ca 250-598-8628

Victoria Centre Observatory gets a new telescope!

Posted by as News

TPO 16" f/8 Ritchey-Chretien Truss Tube Astrograp
TPO 16″ f/8 Ritchey-Chretien Truss Tube Astrograph

On July 12th Victoria Centre’s Council approved a plan to replace the telescopes currently in our observatory with new and improved optics. The Technical Committee’s plan includes replacing our existing Meade 14” SCT and Tele Vue NP 127is apochromatic refractor with a 16” F/8 Ritchey­ Chretien (RC) optical system. The new gear will be mounted on our existing Paramount ME mount, giving us a simpler setup that is actually a bit lighter than the old configuration.

The cost of the new RC telescope and accessories will be about $14,000, depending on the US$ exchange rate. Most of the gear will be purchased from OPT Oceanside Photo & Telescope in California, since they sell their brand TPO Ritchey Chretien telescopes at very attractive prices, and we took advantage of a recent sale price. We expect to eventually sell our surplus instruments and accessories, but will keep the current setup in place until the new gear arrives and is installed, in order to maximize the availability of the VCO to members.

We will fundraise from our members to directly offset the upgrade costs, since Victoria Centre Council originally budgeted $9,000 for the upgrade some months ago.

Benefits

  • Improved cool down time
    • new RC is a truss design open tube giving good airflow around the primary optics,
    • old SCT is a closed tube design with a corrector plate restricting air flow
  • Improved guiding accuracy
    • new RC system will use an in-line off-axis guider,
    • old SCT system uses a piggyback-mounted telescope for guiding
  • Improved pointing accuracy
    • new RC system has a fixed primary mirror,
    • old SCT system suffers from primary mirror flop
  • Improved light gathering and resolution
    • new RC system has a 16″ primary mirror
    • old SCT system has a 14″ primary mirror and a corrector plate
  • Easier operation
    • new RC system is a single optical tube that will be used for guiding, imaging and observing
    • old system included an SCT, a Hyperstar f/2 attachment, a 127mm apo-chromaic refractor, and a guide scope, all mounted piggyback and in a custom cradle
  • We wish to enter RASC’s 150th year in 2018 with a first-rate observatory!

Fundraising

Our target is to raise $5,000 from members over the next few months. Tax receipts will be issued for all donations.

Joe Carr is our fundraiser, so please contact him for questions about the new telescope or to donate – email or telephone 250-294-1992.

Bruce Lane is our Treasurer, who will issue tax receipts and account for all donations to Council and members – email.

The first fundraising event was held at the RASCals Star Party on Saturday, July 29th at 2PM in Metchosin House. Thanks to everyone who donated so generously – we are already over half way to our target!

VCO Upgrade – fundraising slideshow – 1.8Mb pdf

 

New Equipment

Surplus Equipment

  • Meade 14″ SCT $2,000.00
  • Hyperstar f/2 $500.00
  • Cradle $300.00
  • Tele Vue NP127is $5,000.00
  • Total $7,800.00

Estimated Net Cost after sale of surplus $6,800

Please note that proceeds of the sale of used astronomical equipment is highly variable and can take many months. RASC Victoria Centre and then all RASC members will be given first chance to purchase our surplus equipment. Please contact Joe by email or telephone 250-294-1992 if you are interested.

RASCals Star Party 2017

Posted by as Events

July 28-30, 2017

At the Metchosin Municipal Grounds
behind the Metchosin Fire Hall
4440 Happy Valley Road, Victoria, BC, Canada

The observing field at dusk on Friday night
The observing field at dusk on Friday night

Gates will open at 12pm noon on Friday. Camp on the field and setup your telescope.

Cost: Free of charge! RASC members and visiting observers (who stay overnight): suggested donation of $20/Adult one day, two or three.

Everyone who is present is entitled to tickets for door prizes, lectures and access to the observing field. Prizes include telescopes!

Don’t want to camp? No problem…you can drive home after an evening of fun on the observing field.

Staying after dark? Please bring a red light with you – no white lights!

 

Photo gallery for RASCals 2017 Star Party

Schedule of Events

Friday 28th

  • 2:00 pm – Gates open
  • 8:00 pm – Welcome and door prizes
  • 8:30 pm – Speaker – Elizabeth Griffin, PhD (NRC – Hertzberg) Big data, little data, or (Help!) no data
  • 10:00 pm until dawn: observing! No white lights during this time, please

Saturday 29th

  • Solar viewing – all day on the field
  • 1:00 pm – Eclipse Viewing – Michael Webb in Metchosin House
  • 2:00 pm – New telescope for Victoria Centre Observatory – fundraiser & reception in Metchosin House
  • 8:00 pm – Door prizes
  • 8:30 pm – Speaker – Henry Ngo, PhD (NRC – Hertzberg) Exploring Exoplanets
  • 9:30 pm – Public viewing of the night sky with RASC telescopes
  • 10:00 pm until dawn: observing! No white lights during this time, please

Sunday 30th

  • Cleanup – everyone please pitch-in & help
  • 12:00 pm – early departures please!

 Prizes!


Please feel free to camp on the field with your tent, trailer or motorhome and setup your telescope and other astronomy gear. There is some power on the field for astronomy equipment, but no RV plug-ins please! Also, please do NOT park on the field with your vehicle if you plan to leave after dark! In this case, move your vehicle off the field after setting up, and park on the access road beside the municipal hall with your headlights facing away from the field (towards the firehall). The same parking request applies to visitors for the evening – park beside the municipal hall and walk into the field.

 

President’s Message – June 2017

Posted by as President's Message

Another year of Astro Café has concluded. I would like to thank Barb, Reg, and John for the great series of topics, photos, videos, and of course, snacks we shared. With the installation of the larger television screen earlier this year, it is much improved for the sharing of astrophotography, videos, and the like. Astro Café continues to be a well-attended centre event and we look forward to another year starting in September. If you have not been to Astro Café recently, or ever, I encourage you to come by one Monday evening. I don’t think you will be disappointed!

The 2017 Summer Star Parties at the DAO are in full swing and we have had some good observing weather. As we enter summer, the emphasis will be on solar astronomy and targets that can be seen while the sky remains light. If you are not already on the volunteer’s list, and want to help out, please send me an email at president@victoria.rasc.ca. There are many more Saturdays on the calendar and new volunteers are most welcome.

As space exploration is in the news frequently, we have some great conversations at the star parties. I really enjoy sharing that time at the telescope that is often someone’s first time seeing a solar prominence or looking at the moon through a telescope. We’ve even had astronomical events that centre members have not seen before. For example, on 3 June, we saw the double shadow transit of Jupiter’s moons Ganymede and Io during the evening. That was a first for me and something I will look out for in the future. The shadow transit coincided with the Great Red Spot being visible so that was great all around!

With general interest in astronomy, I have long thought it is under represented in the school curriculum. Considering the major contributions of Canadian astronomers, it is surprising that our students do not have more exposure to space science and, in particular, the opportunity to take a senior level course in astronomy. I was very happy to learn that teachers at Victoria High School are working to correct that with the introduction of an Astronomy 11 course. The course launches in the 2017 – 18 school year and the initial impressions are that quite a few students are interested in taking this new course. That is a great step forward and I hope it proves to be a great success. As part of the launch of this new course, Victoria High School is hosting a Star Party on Saturday 17 June starting at 8:30 p.m. If you are in the area why not attend? Please see cuyeda.weebly.com/star-party.html for more information.

Finally, as a reminder, our RASCals Star Party will be held on weekend of 28 – 30 July on the District of Metchosin municipal grounds. Information will be posted on our website once we have more details about the events that day. Saturday 29 July has been identified as the National Star Party day with events taking place across Canada as part of the sesquicentennial. I hope many members will come to the party again this year.

Speaker: Radio and Microwave Astronomy – Dr. Lisa Locke

Posted by as Meetings

June 14th, 2017, 7:30PM, University of Victoria, Bob Wright Centre A104 – RASC Victoria Centre’s monthly meeting

Event info

Radio and Microwave Astronomy – History, Canadian Involvement, and Interesting Tidbits – Dr. Lisa Locke, NRC Herzberg

Dr. Lisa Locke
Dr. Lisa Locke

Radio astronomy started in the early 1930s as an electrical engineering project and it took many years for the optical astronomy community to include it under the gilded Astronomy umbrella. Early experimentalists had a field day with surplus World War II equipment and the increased world-wide collaboration between researchers. I will explain and guide through this history up to the present, contrasting the new radio astronomy with the classic well-understood optical ideas, highlighting Canada’s significant role in the growing field. Details on current instrumentation projects and observatories will also be presented.

Bio

Dr. Lisa Shannon Locke was born north of the 60th parallel in Hay River, Northwest Territories, Canada and received the B.Sc (Alberta, 1997), M.Sc. (Cape Town, 2001) and PhD (Victoria, 2014) degrees all in electrical engineering specializing in low-noise microwave astronomy instrumentation.

As a student, she worked at the Canadian Space Agency, CalTech’s Owens Valley Observatory and at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, WV. After graduating, she spent five years as a receiver engineer at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. Then in 2005 she joined the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM building cryogenic receivers for the expanded very large array (EVLA).

Her PhD degree was advised by Prof. Dr. Jens Bornemann and the late Dr. Stéphane Claude of NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC. Her thesis investigated the design and construction of a K-band (18 – 26 GHz) coherent 5×5 phased array feed for use on large radio astronomy reflectors. She is currently employed with NRC Herzberg and leads a multi-disciplinary project to build a S/C-band (2.8 – 5.18 GHz) cryogenic phased array feed receiver system.

President’s Message – May 2017

Posted by as President's Message

I will start with a riddle this month. Question: What do you call the rainy day between 2 sunny days? Answer: Astronomy day.

Although the weather did not cooperate, this year’s Astronomy Day was a fantastic event. Thank you to everyone who contributed and especially Ken Mallory for getting all of us organized. I was pleased to see that there are a more organizations participating with us making it an even better. For example, Knowledge Network of BC approached us this year about showing Space Suite I and Space Suite II. If you have not seen these short videos they are very enjoyable; both are available on the Knowledge Network website. The Royal BC Museum is an excellent host so I would like to acknowledge their outstanding support.

Despite the rainy weather, we did have quite a good turnout on the hill for our first Summer Star Party so it can only get better with clear weather. As we have such a great facility on our doorstep it is wonderful that we can share it with the public. One of the goals with having more evenings this year is to have more visitors so I do hope we can achieve that goal.

At a recent Astro Café we were talking about apps and websites that we enjoy. One iOS app I shared, that is also available as a website, is called The Scale of the Universe 2. Based on a continuing progression of sizes centred on 1 metre, the user scrolls in either direction to see examples of things that are that microscopic and beyond all the way to some of the largest known objects. There are a number of named astronomical objects included so this is a tool that can be used to show comparative sizes. Did you know that Jupiter would fill more than a third of the distance from the Earth to the Moon? If you look around the 108.5 m zone you will see this comparison. The Sun appears around 109 m but you don’t see Antares until 1012 m. It is quite fascinating. If you are interested in the miniature world, great examples of the very small are there as well. Check it out; it is very well done.

A reminder that we are back in our normal room, Bob Wright Centre A104, for our monthly meeting on 10 May.

Meetings

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SPEAKER: Imagining New Worlds – Benjamin Gerard

 

Wednesday, May 10th 2017 at 7:30PM, University of Victoria, Bob Wright Centre Room A104 – RASC Victoria Centre’s Monthly Meeting

The past 20 years has seen the dawn of a new field in astronomy: extrasolar planets, or exoplanets for short—planets orbiting around stars in other solar systems. We now know that the Universe is teeming with exoplanets, thanks largely to the help of the Kepler space telescope, which finds exoplanets by seeing their shadow on its much brighter host star. Although there are a number of different methods of finding exoplanets, my research focuses on an exoplanet detection technique called direct imaging, which as the name suggests is designed to directly image these other worlds. But this is not as simple as it sounds, and it ultimately requires the use of our most powerful telescopes and specially designed optical systems in order to distinguish an exoplanet from the overwhelming glare of its host star. In light of the upcoming total Solar eclipse in August 2017, I’ll describe one of these instruments, called a coronagraph, which was first used to observe the Solar Corona without the help of the Moon! After outlining these challenges, both in engineering and in physics, and how they can be overcome, I will highlight the main instruments and detections in this field of direct imaging, and also compare the advantages direct imaging has over other techniques. Come prepared to see real pictures of other worlds!

Bio

Benjamin Gerard is a 1st year PhD student in Physics and Astronomy at UVic. He did his Bachelors in Physics and Astronomy at University of Colorado at Boulder and is originally from San Francisco, CA. His research, supervised by Dr. Christian Marois, focuses on optical design and image processing algorithms for instruments made to directly image exoplanets.

Summer Star Parties at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 2017

Posted by as Special Events

The Friends of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (FDAO) and RASC Victoria Centre will be hosting nineteen Saturday evenings at the DAO, featuring guest speakers, solar and nighttime observing with telescopes provided by RASC Victoria Centre volunteers, tours of the historic Plaskett telescope, and more! Rain or shine, we will have something for everyone to experience.

Dates begin with International Astronomy Day on April 29th. Here are all the dates:

  • May 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th
  • June 3rd, 10th, 17th, and 24th
  • July 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th
  • August 5th, 12th, 19th, and 26th
  • September 16th and 23rd

PLEASE NOTE: due to the extreme traffic congestion in previous years, admission is now by ticket ONLY. Tickets are FREE and will be available during the week preceding each Saturday evening from our EventBrite site: http://daostarparties.eventbrite.ca

See you there!

Site Line Work Only

Summer Star Parties at the DAO run every Saturday evening from April 29th to September 23rd with some exceptions as noted in the schedule above. To enhance your experience please note the following venues before you arrive. Activities are broken up in to seven main areas,

  1. Lecture Hall – This summer we have a full slate of topical presentations from the astronomy community which includes researchers, authors and passionate amateurs. There are possibilities of surprise guest speakers. Come early most presentations start at 8 p.m. and some though not all repeat in the evening.
  2. Plaskett Dome – The dome is a heritage site, and not to be missed. Tours are approximately 45 minutes long and start at 7:45 p.m. Two other tours start at 8:30 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.
  3. Planetarium – Planetarium shows run 6 times during the evening and are approximately 30 minutes in length. Come inside and learn about the constellations, and even a little sky lore!
  4. 16” Telescope – This research-grade telescope was originally located on Mt Kobau near Osoyoos for site testing towards potentially building an observatory there. It was then moved here to the DAO, and then from another area on the DAO property to this site when the Centre of the Universe building was constructed in the early 1990s. It is now available for viewing “live” through an eyepiece. The telescope is open subject to weather conditions most of the evening.
  5. RASC Member Telescopes – Royal Astronomical Society of Canada members have been long standing participants at Saturdays nights at the DAO for nearly 100 years. Weather permitting, members will take you on a telescopic tour of the evening sky.
  6. Information Area – There are volunteers available to help you with your evening visit and if you’re interested they can let you know how you can get involved in astronomy activities in Victoria. Look for kid friendly displays from Science Ventures in this same area.
  7. Interpretive Centre Displays – The displays from the former interpretive centre show Canada’s role in astronomy and contain a number of historical artifacts of interest.

 

Summer Star Parties at the DAO 2017 Presentations

Summer Saturdays’ Children’s Programmes

7:45-8:00 p.m. “Out of this World” Interactive Presentation – Auditorium

8:00-8:15 p.m. “Stories in the Skies” – Planetarium

8:15-8:30 p.m. “Meet the Telescope” Tour – Plaskett Dome

8:30-10:00 p.m. Children’s Activities – Information Area

  • Make and Take Craft Tables
  • Family Scavenger Hunt
  • IPad Interactives
  • Night Sky Viewing

 

August 12th, 2017 – Falling through space – Dr. Gordon Walker

8:15 – 9:15 p.m.

Abstract: Isaac Newton gave the first clear illustration of how space travel from Earth was possible while, later, Einstein predicted the gravitational deflection of light.  I shall explore the remarkable implications of these two ideas and how we are all `falling through space’.

Bio: UBC Prof Emeritus Astrophysics (ret 1997), PhD Cambridge (1962). Life long interest in astronomical instruments, particularly low light level detection and  pioneered a number of new techniques, notably in the search for extra-solar planets.  Current interests: large interstellar molecules, interstellar dust, extra-solar planets and brown dwarfs, and the possibility of putting a spectroscopic telescope at the lunar south pole.

 

August 12th, 2017 – Opening New Eyes on the Cosmos – Dr. Luc Simard

9:15 – 10:15 p.m.

Abstract: Canadian scientists and engineers have been building ever more powerful telescopes for almost a century. This tradition of opening new eyes on the cosmos is alive and well with plans for new, cutting-edge telescopes covering a wide swath of the electromagnetic spectrum from the ultraviolet to radio waves. This talk will go over the new technologies needed for these telescopes with a look at the wonderful and exciting scientific discoveries ahead.

Bio: Dr. Luc Simard is an astronomer at the National Research Council of Canada. He obtained his B.Sc. from Queen’s University in 1990 and his Ph.D. from the University of Victoria in 1996. From 1996 to 2002, he held postdoctoral fellowships at the University of California, Santa Cruz and the University of Arizona, Steward Observatory. He joined NRC-HIA in 2002. His research interests include galaxy formation and evolution, image processing and astronomical instrumentation. He worked on developing instruments for the Thirty Meter Telescope from 2005 to 2017. He is now the Director of the Astronomy Technology Program at NRC Herzberg.

 

August 19th, 2017 – Big data, little data, or (Help!) no data – Dr. Elizabeth Griffin

8:15 – 9:15 p.m.

Abstract: A talk delivered recently at the Rascals Star Party in Metchosin. Find out what there is to know about data.

Bio:  Born & bred in the UK, I studied Astronomy at London and Cambridge Universities.  I have worked on binary stars for most of my career, and for some 25 years I worked photographically because that was all there was (oh dear, that does date me!).  Having thus experience in both photographic and electronic data, I feel well placed to help those who seek to recover astronomy’s own nearly-lost heritage of photographic data.  I emigrated to Canada 15 years ago, and live quite near the DAO, where I’m a keen gardener and grow my own food.

 

August 19th, 2017 – Knowledge Network Space Suite I and II and Trailer for Space Suite III – Two Story Productions Inc.

9:15 – 10:00 p.m.

Knowledge Network and Two Story Productions Inc. have kindly provided us with the ability to show the spectacular astronomy themed series Space Suite I and II. Composed of 10 short clips for each suite it combines astronomy imagery with classical music. On the same evening we hope to have the trailer for the new Space Suite III.

 

August 26th, 2017 – Gas Falling Into Black Holes: A Surprising Discovery – Dr. Patrick Hall

8:15 – 9:15 p.m.

Abstract: A black holes is inferred to exist at the center of every massive galaxy, including our own Milky Way. We cannot see such a black hole directly, but we can see light from hot gas orbiting the black hole. This gas forms a disk larger than the Earth’s orbit around the Sun and hotter than the surface of the Sun, putting out enough light to be seen across the universe; we call this light a quasar. For 50 years we have known that some quasars have part of their light absorbed by gas streaming AWAY from the black holes, in winds lifted from the surface of these disks. A few years ago, I discovered some cases of absorption which may come from gas streaming INTO the black holes. It is difficult to explain the speeds at which the gas appears to be falling into the black holes in these quasars; some of them may instead be cases of winds in systems with two black holes orbiting each other.

Bio: Dr. Patrick Hall is an astronomer and Professor in York University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, currently on sabbatical in Victoria.  Born in California to Canadian parents, he double-majored in Physics and Astronomy at U. C. Berkeley and obtained a doctorate in astronomy at U. Arizona (even if it took 7.5 years). He then studied galaxies as a postdoctoral fellow at U. Toronto and quasars as a postdoc at Princeton and the Universidad Catolica de Chile before joining the faculty at York. He splits his time between research on quasars (and anything else astronomical that catches his fancy), teaching astronomy, and outreach.

 

August 26th, 2017 – A Star Is Born: Unveiling the Turbulent Birth of Stars – Dr. Doug Johnstone

 9:15 – 10:15 p.m.

Abstract: The birth of stars remains shrouded in mystery. They form inside thick puddles of gas and dust located primarily along the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Astronomers use infrared and radio telescopes to peer into and through these murky puddles to witness the birth of stars. For over 25 years the JCMT has been leading investigations to uncover the formation of stars in the Galaxy. In collaboration with the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Herschel Space Observatory, the ALMA Observatory in Chile, and the soon to be launched JWST, the JCMT has transformed our understanding of stellar birth. Join me on an adventure to uncover nearby stellar nurseries.

Bio: Dr. Doug Johnstone is a Principal Research Astronomer at NRC’s Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics. For two years he was the Associate Director of the James Cleark Maxwell Telescope, a 15-m telescope on Maunakea devoted to observations of the sky at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Doug’s main research interests follow the formation of stars and planetary systems. He began his professional life as a theorist at the University of California, Berkeley, working on the evolution of circumstellar disks around young stars, back before extra-solar planet detections were common.  Today, Dr. Johnstone’s research focuses on the formation and evolution of structure in molecular clouds, attempting to disentangle the physical processes through which a molecular cloud sheds into individual stars.

 

September 16th, 2017 – Exoplanet Travel Agency – Dr. Henry Ngo

 8:15 – 9:15 p.m.

Abstract: There are 8 planets in our solar system, but what about all the other stars in our Galaxy? Astronomers now know that almost every star is expected to have its own planets. Through telescopes on the ground and in space, scientists have discovered and catalogued many thousands of worlds. Most of these worlds are very different from what we are used to in our own solar system. This presentation will be a guided tour through the surprising and diverse worlds we’ve found around other stars.

Bio: Dr. Henry Ngo recently joined NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics in July 2017 as a Plaskett postdoctoral research fellow. Henry was born in Mississauga, Ontario but grew up in Richmond, BC. He finished a Bachelor’s degree in Physics and Astronomy at UBC and a Masters degree in Astronomy at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Henry just graduated with a PhD in Planetary Science from Caltech earlier this year. His current research involves using large telescopes on Hawaii to try to find new giant planets around nearby stars.

 

September 16th, 2017 – Planet 9 or Planet Nein? Discoveries in the Distant Reaches of the Solar System

 – Dr. Samantha Lawther

9:15 – 10:15 p.m.

Abstract: To date, over 2,000 small icy worlds have been discovered in the Kuiper Belt.  By carefully studying their orbits, we can reconstruct the history of planet formation and migration in our Solar System.  We can also use Kuiper Belt orbits to learn about the most distant reaches of the Solar System.  I’ll talk about results from our recent Kuiper Belt survey using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, and what it tells us about whether there is likely to be an undiscovered giant planet lurking on the edge of the Solar System.

Bio: Dr. Samantha Lawler is a Plaskett Fellow at NRC-Herzberg.  She studies the orbits of Kuiper Belt Objects, exoplanets, and dust disks around other stars.  When she’s not busy with running simulations on a supercomputer, she indulges her farming addiction.

 

President’s Message – April 2017

Posted by as President's Message

April will see the start of the centre’s outreach season. A major event in our calendar is Astronomy Day that will be held on Saturday 29 April at the Royal BC Museum from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This will be followed by the first of the Summer Star Parties at the DAO.

Please contact Ken (outreach@victoria.rasc.ca) to volunteer to help out with the outreach events that will be occurring this year. We would like to have solar telescopes and people at the table to answer questions. One of the first of these events is Esquimalt Buccaneer Days on 13 and 14 May.

We are looking forward to another set of Summer Star Parties on Observatory Hill. One change this year will be that the Friends of the DAO (FDAO) will lead these evenings. There will be a longer season this year including the Saturdays closest to the solstice. Due to the high demand in past years, we have decided to try opening to visitors even on the evenings when it will not be astronomically dark by closing time. Assuming clear skies, we should have some good solar viewing on those evenings so that could make up for the lack of a night sky!

With the FDAO leading, this will allow evenings to continue on the Saturdays when RASC members are involved with other events. One example of this is Saturday 29 July that coincides with the RASCals Star Party in Metchosin. As you may recall, RASC has designated that Saturday as the national star party day in honour of the sesquicentennial. This means there will be 2 star parties in Greater Victoria that day giving members of the public the option to go to the observatory or the Metchosin municipal grounds.

The Summer Star Parties will occur on Saturday evenings from Saturday 29 April 29 to Saturday 23 September with a few exceptions. There will not be a star party on Saturday 1 July so that everyone can enjoy Canada Day and the 150th anniversary of confederation. We are going to skip the Labour Day weekend and there is also an evening in September when there is a concert in the dome instead.

A reminder that due to April exams being scheduled in our regular meeting room, our monthly meeting on Wednesday 12 April will be in the Elliott Building Lecture Wing Room 167.